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10 апреля 2009 | Автор: Admin | Рубрика: Компьютерная литература » Game Design | Комментариев: 0

Game Design: Theory and Practice, 2nd Edition

* Publisher: Wordware Publishing, Inc.
* Number Of Pages: 584
* Publication Date: 2001-02-25
* Sales Rank: 144227
* ISBN / ASIN: 1556229127
* EAN: 9781556229121

“Both burgeoning game designers and devoted gamers should consider [Game Design: Theory & Practice] an essential read.” — Computer Gaming World

“Ultimately, in both theory and practice, Rouse’s Game Design bible gets the job done. Let us pray.”— Next Generation magazine


In the second edition to the acclaimed Game Design: Theory & Practice, designer Richard Rouse III balances a discussion of the essential concepts behind game design with an explanation of how you can implement them in your current project. Detailed analysis of successful games is interwoven with concrete examples from Rouse’s own experience. This second edition thoroughly updates the popular original with new chapters and fully revised text.

* Follow the entire game development process, from brainstorming a game idea and establishing the focus to getting the gameplay working and playtesting.
* Learn the techniques of top game designers through in-depth interviews:
Doug Church, Thief, System Shock, Ultima Underworld
Chris Crawford, Balance of Power, Eastern Front (1941)
Ed Logg, Asteroids, Centipede, Gauntlet
Jordan Mechner, Prince of Persia, Karateka, The Last Express
Sid Meier, Civilization, Pirates!, Railroad Tycoon, Gettysburg!
Steve Meretzky, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Planetfall,
Zork Zero
* Will Wright, SimCity, The Sims Learn how to most effectively document your game ideas. Includes the full design document for the action-horror game The Suffering.



Richard Rouse III is design director at Surreal Software, a Midway Home Entertainment studio. Most recently, he was project lead, lead designer, and writer on the action-horror game The Suffering. His credits also include Drakan: The Ancients’ Gates, Centipede 3D, Damage Incorporated, and Odyssey: The Legend of Nemesis. Rouse has written about game design for publications including Game Developer, SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics, Develop, Gamasutra, MyVideoGames.com, and Inside Mac Games, and has spoken on game development numerous times at the Electronic Entertainment Expo.



Table of Contents
Foreword xvi
Introduction to the Second Edition xvii
Introduction xx
What Players Want
1 (19)
Why Do Players Play?
2 (6)
Players Want a Challenge
2 (1)
Players Want to Socialize
3 (2)
Players Want a Dynamic Solitary Experience
5 (1)
Players Want Bragging Rights
5 (1)
Players Want an Emotional Experience
6 (1)
Players Want to Explore
6 (1)
Players Want to Fantasize
7 (1)
Players Want to Interact
8 (1)
What Do Players Expect?
8 (11)
Players Expect a Consistent World
8 (1)
Players Expect to Understand the Game-World's Bounds
9 (1)
Players Expect Reasonable Solutions to Work
10 (1)
Players Expect Direction
10 (1)
Players Expect to Accomplish a Task Incrementally
11 (1)
Players Expect to Be Immersed
12 (2)
Players Expect Some Setbacks
14 (1)
Players Expect a Fair Chance
14 (1)
Players Expect to Not Need to Repeat Themselves
15 (1)
Players Expect to Not Get Hopelessly Stuck
16 (1)
Players Expect to Do, Not to Watch
17 (1)
Players Do Not Know What They Want, but They Know When It Is Missing
18 (1)
A Never-Ending List
19 (1)
Interview: Sid Meier
20 (20)
Brainstorming a Game Idea: Gameplay, Technology, and Story
40 (17)
Starting Points
41 (6)
Starting with Gameplay
42 (1)
Starting with Technology
43 (2)
Starting with Story
45 (2)
Working with Limitations
47 (5)
Odyssey: The Legend of Nemesis
48 (1)
Damage Incorporated
49 (1)
Centipede 3D
50 (1)
The Suffering
51 (1)
Embrace Your Limitations
52 (4)
Established Technology
53 (1)
The Case of the Many Mushrooms
54 (1)
The Time Allotted
55 (1)
If You Choose Not to Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice
56 (1)
Game Analysis: Centipede
57 (12)
Classic Arcade Game Traits
59 (3)
Input
62 (1)
Interconnectedness
63 (2)
Escalating Tension
65 (2)
One Person, One Game
67 (2)
Focus
69 (18)
Establishing Focus
70 (7)
An Example: Winter Carnival Whirlwind
72 (2)
The Function of the Focus
74 (3)
Maintaining Focus
77 (5)
Fleshing Out the Focus
78 (1)
Changing Focus
79 (3)
Sub-Focuses
82 (3)
Using Focus
85 (2)
Interview: Ed Logg
87 (28)
The Elements of Gameplay
115 (26)
Unique Solutions
116 (3)
Anticipatory versus Complex Systems
116 (1)
Emergence
117 (2)
Non-Linearity
119 (6)
Types of Non-Linearity
119 (2)
Implementation
121 (2)
The Purpose of Non-Linearity
123 (2)
Modeling Reality
125 (2)
Teaching the Player
127 (4)
Tutorials
128 (3)
Input/Output
131 (9)
Controls and Input
131 (5)
Output and Game-World Feedback
136 (4)
Basic Elements
140 (1)
Game Analysis: Tetris
141 (10)
Puzzle Game or Action Game?
142 (2)
Tetris as a Classic Arcade Game
144 (2)
The Technology
146 (1)
Artificial Intelligence
147 (1)
Escalating Tension
148 (1)
Simplicity and Symmetry
149 (1)
Fifteen Years On, Who Would Publish Tetris?
150 (1)
Artificial Intelligence
151 (21)
Goals of Game AI
153 (9)
Challenge the Player
154 (2)
Not Do Dumb Things
156 (1)
Be Unpredictable
157 (2)
Assist Storytelling
159 (3)
Create a Living World
162 (1)
The Sloped Playing Field
162 (2)
How Real Is Too Real?
163 (1)
AI Agents and Their Environment
164 (3)
How Good Is Good Enough?
167 (1)
Scripting
168 (3)
Artificial Stupidity
171 (1)
Interview: Steve Meretzky
172 (30)
Storytelling
202 (25)
Designer's Story Versus Player's Story
203 (3)
Places for Storytelling
206 (11)
Out-of-Game
207 (5)
In-Game
212 (4)
External Materials
216 (1)
Linear Writing Pitfalls
217 (5)
Player Character Personality
218 (4)
Game Stories
222 (3)
Non-Linearity
223 (1)
Working with the Gameplay
224 (1)
The Dream
225 (2)
Game Analysis: Loom
227 (10)
Focused Game Mechanics
228 (2)
User Interface
230 (1)
The Drafts System
231 (2)
Difficulty
233 (1)
Story
233 (2)
Loom as an Adventure Game
235 (2)
Multi-Player
237 (20)
Motivations
238 (1)
The Forms
239 (3)
Single System Multi-Player
239 (2)
Online Multi-Player
241 (1)
Design Considerations
242 (9)
Playing to Strengths
244 (2)
Protect Newbies
246 (2)
Socialization
248 (3)
Development Issues
251 (5)
Playtesting and User Feedback
253 (3)
A World of Their Own
256 (1)
Interview: Chris Crawford
257 (24)
Getting the Gameplay Working
281 (15)

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